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first-year undergraduate

Shelly Belleau's picture

ELLs and Science Practices

Fri, 06/05/2015 - 11:38 -- Shelly Belleau
more research

In a previous blog post, I shared my thoughts about the importance of science teachers (and all teachers, really) supporting their claims about lesson efficacy with evidence.  While this doesn’t always need to be a formal research study, it can often be valuable to publish findings that will be helpful to other science teachers.

 

Tom Kuntzleman's picture

How Does an Orange Peel Pop a Balloon? Chemistry, of Course!

Tue, 03/24/2015 - 15:15 -- Tom Kuntzleman

The juice from an orange peel causes a balloon to pop.  When I first saw this effect I immediately thought to myself, “what is the chemistry involved in this experiment?” After quickly searching the web, I found several claims that a compound in orange peels called limonene (Figure 1) is responsible for this effect.  Limonene is a hydrocarbon, which means that molecules of limonene are composed of only carbon and hydrogen atoms.  Limonene is responsible for the wonderful smell of oranges, and it is a liquid at room temperature.

Tom Kuntzleman's picture

Chemical Mystery #4: The Case of the Misbehaving Balloon

Tue, 02/03/2015 - 11:19 -- Tom Kuntzleman

Conducting experiments with liquid nitrogen experiments is a sure-fire way to energize many chemistry lessons. Unfortunately, getting access to liquid nitrogen can be a bit difficult. I happen to purchase liquid nitrogen from Airgas; you might be able to find a branch near you here.

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