Welcome. Please log in or register.

Environment

Deanna Cullen's picture

Beyond Benign

Thu, 10/03/2013 - 12:59 -- Deanna Cullen

Environmental studies can be included in any science curriculum.  Whether you are looking for lessons to incorporate ideas related to "green chemistry" or you are looking to use safer methods and materials in the laboratory, you will find many great resources at this site.  There are new labs and also replacement labs for some of those familar activities that we shouldn't be doing anymore.   Th

Hal Harris's picture

Climate Change Denial in the Classroom

Sat, 05/04/2013 - 23:40 -- Hal Harris

Universities should be and are expected to be sources of truthful and unbiased information about controversial subjects, especially in the sciences.  Unfortunately, that is not always the case.  Instructors at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada used "academic freedom" to present an egregiously biased and unscientific course that misrepresented the facts of climate change.

Hal Harris's picture

The Artificial Leaf: Daniel Nocera's vision for sustainable energy

Sun, 05/20/2012 - 11:19 -- Hal Harris

MIT’s Dan Nocera (soon to be Harvard’s) gave a seminar in our department about a year and a half ago, and I heard him speak again in ACS President Bassam Shakhashiri’s ”Presidential Symposium on Catalysis” at the Spring national meeting in San Diego. The chemistry he described is a beautiful example of how fundamental research can potentially impact the lives of billions of people. Dan and his research group have discovered what appears to be an inexpensive, self-healing, air-tolerant catalytic system to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. We have seen before grand announcements about photocatalytic water-splitting systems, but this one appears not to suffer the fatal flaws of the others – requirement of pure water, expensive ingredients, and short duty cycles.

Hal Harris's picture

The Climate Fixers

Thu, 05/17/2012 - 15:32 -- Hal Harris

Suppose that the earth’s atmosphere continues to warm, beyond the levels that we know are already inevitable.  Suppose that the arctic permafrost melts, releasing millions of tons of methane, which is about thirty times more effective at warming than is carbon dioxide, as well as much CO2 as is already in the atmosphere. Within a few years, the mean temperature rises by five degrees Celsius or more, sea levels rise, crops fail and millions starve.

Hal Harris's picture

Nuclear Energy: What Everyone Needs to Know

Wed, 06/01/2011 - 01:00 -- Hal Harris

Do tsunamis affect global warming? Well, the 2004 Indian Ocean catastrophe probably indirectly decreased the amount of carbon dioxide going into the atmosphere by destroying the lives of 200,000 victims and the livelihoods of probably 250,000 more. Of course, it also negatively affected coral reefs, mangroves and other wetlands, forests, and plant diversity.

Hal Harris's picture

The Efficiency Dilemma: What's the best way to use less energy?

Wed, 12/01/2010 - 00:00 -- Hal Harris

I have always thought that the answer to the question in the subtitle of this David Owen article was clear: make the things we do with energy using less of it. Now I am rethinkng that proposition. Owen writes about the application of "Jevons paradox" to energy consumption: the economical use of a resource results not in less consumption, but of more!

Hal Harris's picture

Gusher of Lies: The Dangerous Delusions of 'Energy Independence'

Tue, 04/01/2008 - 01:00 -- Hal Harris

Robert Bryce is a respected commentator on the energy industry. He writes for Atlantic Monthly, the Guardian and The Nation, and he has written books about Enron and about the oil industry in Texas. In "Gusher of Lies", he confronts politicians and entrepeneurs who claim that the United States should/could become "energy independent" at any time in the forseeable future.

Pages

Subscribe to Environment